super surfacer vs planer

Discussion board for precision planers

Re: super surfacer vs planer

PostPosted by ktm_300xcw_rider » Sun Oct 13, 2013 11:25 pm

I watched the video. To me, there wasn't night and day differences between several of the treatment combinations he tested. I was a bit surprised at how well the cut was without the cap iron.

The very shallow cut (.005 mm) was very nice. It also appeared that the cut with the 80 degree cap iron angle performed about the same regardless of distance it was placed away from the iron edge.

Are your take-aways different?
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Re: super surfacer vs planer

PostPosted by Correy Smith » Mon Oct 14, 2013 7:37 am

I think the lesson is in reverse grain a lighter pass with a micro bevel on the chip breaker steeped to about 85 degrees leaves the most tear out free surface. Surfaces made with high pitched cutters are a bit duller looking than those with a single blade at low angle. And the chip breaker becomes more necessary as you enter the reverse areas. In the video I think they are planing consistently into the grain and modifying the knife set-up until it gets the most preferred surface.
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Re: super surfacer vs planer

PostPosted by ktm_300xcw_rider » Mon Oct 14, 2013 2:12 pm

I wonder what type of wood they were using and how well they sharpened their tool? It would have been nice to see the grain of the wood before they started planing to see the grain direction. With only one pass per treatment combination the results could be misleading. e.g. the best setup overall may have been demonstrated on the worst grain situation. And the worst setup may have randomly been done on the best grain situation.
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Re: super surfacer vs planer

PostPosted by Correy Smith » Tue Oct 15, 2013 9:11 pm

Hello,consistently planing into reverse grain as in the video would be considered worst case in terms of milling or surfacing, really couldn't be harder. You would probably consider the surface to be pretty glassy looking, high sheen. The wood was probably a cedar or pine which is some of the hardest to plane cleanly with a bright shiny surface especially with undulating reverse grain. The surface left would probably not exhibit the clarity as planing with the grain but still much brighter than any abrasive could produce. But much faster than any other method just a few seconds to a pass.
There is on youtube, a video by I think a Marunaka sale rep in the Netherlands (?) That shows him surfacing wide panels like you might feed a open end belt sander. Do half , turn around 180 and do the other half. So with the grain one side and against with the other. When the knives are sharp and the machine set properly you should get about the same finish/sheen regardless of grain direction. When you do approach grain that tears out you skew the blade further, up to 45 degrees on my little unit. Mine can only do about 5" wide at 45 degree, being a 240mm knife.
On the solid wood machinery site he has some pics of boards he surfaced, you can see the high luster and sheen produced by the Marunaka SS.
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Re: super surfacer vs planer

PostPosted by Correy Smith » Mon Oct 21, 2013 9:29 pm

Ah! Found the Youtube vidhttp://youtu.be/k5wyCIxZdWI
I guess what really gets me going is the surfacing of the wider panels. Makes me wonder if he cambers the knife, eases the corners or something to avoid a line in the middle. The shavings are about the thickness of a cigarette paper.
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Re: super surfacer vs planer

PostPosted by ktm_300xcw_rider » Tue Oct 22, 2013 3:44 am

It is an impressive process. I'll bet it takes some time to setup the machine the first time. Is your machine running now?
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Re: super surfacer vs planer

PostPosted by Correy Smith » Tue Oct 22, 2013 8:42 am

Naw, my little makita SS is tucked under the out feed on my table saw. The guy I bought it from used gasket sealer as a means to keep the belt from slipping on the material. I think he would have been better served to sharpen the knife. He did say that he never sharpened the blade once and it was still sharp. LOL Far from it really. Hey $200 and another side project. All seems in good working order just need the knives ground back a bit and clean the belt off. Which is the real reason it's still sitting there. The gasket cleaner comes off sloooowwwwww. Not much fun. And would like disposable blades preferably. Still homing in on those for it.
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